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 Vi uses only unscented and organic lotions.

One of the secrets to Vi’s success as a massage therapist is the extensive foundation she has developed through ongoing education.  Occasionally, a massage will consist of only one modality, however, more frequently Vi incorporates various types of massage within one session.  This integration of techniques allows her to meet the very unique and individual needs of each client.

Massage techniques and modalities:

CranioSacral Therapy

CranioSacral Therapy (CST) is a gentle, hands-on approach that releases tensions deep in the body to relieve pain and dysfunction and improve whole-body health and performance. It was pioneered and developed by Osteopathic Physician John E. Upledger after years of clinical testing and research at Michigan State University where he served as professor of biomechanics.

Using a soft touch which is generally no greater than 5 grams – about the weight of a nickel – practitioners release restrictions in the soft tissues that surround the central nervous system. CST is increasingly used as a preventive health measure for its ability to bolster resistance to disease, and it’s effective for a wide range of medical problems associated with pain and dysfunction.

CranioSacral Therapy has proven effective when treating the following issues:

  • Migraines and Headaches
  • Chronic Neck and Back Pain
  • Autism
  •  Stress and Tension-Related Disorders
  • Motor-Coordination Impairments
  • Infant and Childhood Disorders
  • Brain and Spinal Cord Injuries
  • Chronic Fatigue
  •  Fibromyalgia
  • TMJ Syndrome
  • Scoliosis
  • Central Nervous System Disorders
  • Learning Disabilities
  • ADD/ADHD
  • Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder
  • Orthopedic Problems

Hot Stone Massage

 Warmed stones are placed on certain places on the body, such as acupressure points or areas of stress and tension.  The stones may be used as massage tools or be temporarily left in place. Used along with other massage techniques, hot stones can be quite soothing and relaxing as they transmit heat deep into the body.

Lymphatic Drainage Therapy – Lymphatic Facilitation

Lymphatic drainage massage (Lymphatic Facilitation) uses very light pressure of the fingers and hands, just slightly moving the skin, a technique quite different from the long deeper flowing strokes of regular massages. The pattern of strokes in lymphatic drainage massage is very small and precise, moving very slowly and rhythmically, and repeating over and over. Because of this, lymphatic drainage massage is very relaxing and therefore excellent for reducing the effects of stress and tension.

LDT also includes advanced techniques such as Lympho-Fascia Release (LFR) to simultaneously release lesions in the fascia and fluid of the body. These techniques can be applied to viscera, ligaments, tendons, trigger points or fascia in the body

Lymphatic Drainage Massage supports:

  • Reduction in swelling
  • Relief of chronic and sub-acute inflammation and conditions such as acne, eczema and allergies
  • Immune system stimulation for preventive and therapeutic effects
  • Regeneration of tissues (e.g.. from burns and pre- and post-surgical scarring)
  • Detoxification of the body
  • Deep relaxation to aid insomnia, depression, stress, loss of vitality and loss of memory
  • Relief of chronic pain
  • Reduction in the symptoms of chronic fatigue syndrome and fibromyalgia
  • Relieves headaches
  • Advanced techniques supply support for fascia, viscera and joints

Neuromuscular Therapy Massage

Neuromuscular therapy is a form of soft tissue manipulation that aims to treat underlying causes of chronic pain involving the muscular and nervous systems. This medically oriented form of massage addresses trigger points (tender muscles points), circulation, nerve compression, postural issues,  and biomechanical problems that can be caused by repetitive movement injuries. 

Ortho-Bionomy

Ortho-Bionomy is a gentle, non-invasive, system of healing that reminds the body of its natural ability to restore balance.  The body is stimulated using gentle movements, comfortable positioning, brief compression and subtle contact. The result is seemingly effortless pain and tension relief, natural re-alignment, relaxation and a deep sense of well-being. 

Deep Tissue Massage

Deep tissue massage is best for giving attention to certain painful, stiff “trouble spots” in your body. The massage therapist uses deliberate strokes that focus pressure on layers of muscles, tendons, or other tissues deep under your skin. Though less rhythmic than other types of massage, deep tissue massage can be quite therapeutic — relieving chronic patterns of tension and helping with muscle injuries. 

Sports Massage

Developed to help with muscle systems used for a particular sport, sports massage uses a variety of approaches to help athletes in training — before, during, or after sports events. You might use it to promote flexibility and help prevent injuries. Or, it may help muscle strains, aiding healing after a sports injury.

Myocfascial Release

Myofascial Release is a highly specialized stretching technique used to treat patients with a variety of soft tissue problems.

To understand what Myofascial Release is and why it works, you have to understand a little about fascia. Fascia is a thin tissue that covers all the organs of the body. This tissue covers every muscle and every fiber within each muscle. All muscle stretching, then, is actually stretching of the fascia and the muscle, the myofascial unit. When muscle fibers are injured, the fibers and the fascia which surrounds it become short and tight. This uneven stress can be transmitted through the fascia to other parts of the body, causing pain and aggravating symptoms in areas you often wouldn’t expect. Myofascial Release treats these symptoms by releasing the uneven tightness in injured fascia.

In other words, Myofascial Release is stretching of the fascia. The stretch is guided by feedback the therapist feels from the patient’s body. This feedback tells the therapist how much force to use, the direction of the stretch and how long to stretch. Small areas of muscle are stretched at a time. Sometimes the therapist uses only two fingers to stretch a small part of a muscle. The feedback the therapist feels determines which muscles are stretched and in what order.

Each Myofascial Release technique contains the same components. The physical therapist finds the area of tightness. A light stretch is applied to the tight area. The physical therapist waits for the tissue to relax and then increases the stretch. The process is repeated until the area is fully relaxed. Then, the next area is stretched.

Myocfascial Decompression

This technique was recently brought into the mainstream during the 2016 summer Olympic Games when behind the scenes television coverage showed Michael Phelps and other swimmers receiving the treatments.  

Using the Asian modality of Cupping, Myofascial Decompression focuses on treating highly specific areas of tissue restriction with a non-invasive form of therapy.